Carnegie unveils 10-MW W Australia solar project

Solar Farm. Author: Michael Mees meesphotography.com License: Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic.

March 20 (Renewables Now) - Carnegie Clean Energy Ltd (ASX:CCE) expects to start construction in the middle of the year on a 10-MW solar power plant in Western Australia, designed to be battery storage ready.

The build-own-operate project in Northam is to be delivered under the joint venture between Carnegie subsidiary Energy Made Clean (EMC) and Lendlease Services Pty Ltd announced in December. Commissioning is expected by the end of 2017.

The total investment in the park is estimated at between AUD 15 million (EUR 10.6m/USD 11.4m) and AUD 20 million. It will be 100% privately funded and Carnegie is in discussions with third party providers of equity and debt. The company said it has “a range of funding options”, including shared ownership, to make the project a reality.

The solar farm design, costings, land surveys, solar radiation studies and electrical output analysis have been completed. It needs to secure council planning approval and network connection approval from Western Power. Upon completion it can sell power through a power purchase agreement or on a merchant basis into the Wholesale Electricity Market (WEM).

“The Tier 1 capabilities of the EMC Lendlease joint venture, combined with the design, development and financing capabilities of Carnegie, provide us with a clear point of difference in the rapidly emerging utility solar market in Australia. Carnegie is planning on replicating this approach across Australia,” said Carnegie CEO Michael Ottaviano. He added that the ability to add utility scale energy storage is a new feature to be integrated into own solar projects, and also to be offered to other developers of utility scale solar.

(AUD 1 = USD 0.76/EUR 0.71)

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